Our Team

Dr. Mark Landau

Professor

Mark J. Landau is an Associate Professor at the University of Kansas. He received his doctorate from the University of Arizona in 2007. Dr. Landau has published many articles and chapters on metaphor’s influence on social cognition and behavior as well as the role of existential motives in diverse aspects of social behavior. He has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Mental Health

CV: Download (Updated Jan., 2019)
Email: mjlandau@ku.edu

 
 
 
 
 

Dr. Mark Landau

Trevor Swanson

Graduate Research Assistant

My research is currently focused on understanding human motivation through the lens of existential psychology, with a particular interest in how concerns about mortality influence self-regulation. Alongside this work, I am studying the role of conceptual metaphors within language, with an emphasis on how metaphors provide content and structure to our understanding of abstract concepts and thus influence how we perceive the world. Additionally, I am interested in how different strategies of evaluative organization within the self-concept can serve as temporary adaptive solutions to situations of high stress and limited mental resources.

CV: Download (Updated May, 2015)
Email: t092s958@ku.edu

Trevor Swanson

Cory Washington

Graduate Research Assistant

I study how and why people take interest in a goal and persist in the face of difficulty. I’m especially interested in how identity and culture play a role in developing personal relevance for a topic. These ideas can lead to intervention methods to help, for example, first-generation college students get interested in STEM careers; motivating a sub-population of people to get health screenings; helping individuals (with low perceived competence in STEM) be successful in their STEM-related goals by motivating them to take advantage of resources available to help them. Additionally, I use conceptual metaphor theory, expectancy-value model, and identity based motivation as conceptual lenses and tools for my work.

Email: cdwashington@ku.edu

Cory Washington

Joe Conti

Graduate Research Assistant

I’m interested in the diverse ways in which people defend against existential threats such as isolation, meaninglessness, and lack of belonging. Specifically, I study how people may strive to replenish existential resources by engaging with online environments such as games and chatrooms. My goal is to find out when, why, and how this strategy is beneficial and when it is detrimental to mental health and functioning. Additional interests include the utilization of conceptual metaphor theory and the study of time perception.

Email: josephpconti@ku.edu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Joe Conti

Ariel Mosley

Alumnus

Ariel is interested in issues of social power, group identity, and psychological consequences of subtle forms of discrimination. After graduating from California State University, she earned her Master’s degree in Social Psychology with Mark. Her current research examines how experiences of contemporary subtle forms of discrimination influence the self-concept, and vice versa.
 
Email: arielmosley@ku.edu

Ariel Mosley

Dr. Zach Rothschild

Alumnus

Zach graduated in 2013 and has taken a tenure-track position at Bowdoin College. He utilizes perspectives on existential psychology and social cognition to study people’s efforts to maintain meaningful conceptions of the world and a confident sense of personal value.

Email: zrothsch@bowdoin.edu
 
 
 

Dr. Zach Rothschild

Dr. Daniel Sullivan

Alumnus

Daniel graduated in 2013 and has taken a tenure-track position at the University of Arizona. He applies his novel theoretical integration of existential psychology and cultural psychology to investigate how people make meaningful sense of suffering, among other important phenomena.

Email: swolf22@email.arizona.edu

 

Dr. Daniel Sullivan

Dr. Lucas Keefer

Alumnus

Lucas is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Mississippi. His research focuses on how people manage uncertainty about their social environment. In one line of work, he has shown that people manage uncertainty about their close relationships by seeking support from more predictable targets (e.g., material objects) or by adopting reductionist perceptions of others (e.g., objectification). In a related line of work, He has shown that people reduce uncertainty about abstract ideas by conceptualizing them metaphorically, and that this has practically important consequences for attitudes, problem solving, and decision making.

Email: lucas.keefer@gmail.com

Dr. Lucas Keefer